14 Euro Cup Foodie Facts You'd Never Guess

The Action Isn't always on the Field

Berlin, June 24 2016 — It turns out fans of the Euro Cup (which is pretty much all of us) aren’t ordering wurst to support Germany or schnitzel to cheer for Austria. Instead, the foodie habits of fans across Europe are as diverse as the continent itself. At least, that’s what new data, helpfully provided by the food delivery experts over at foodora, reveals. After the conclusion of the first two weeks of the Euro Cup, and before the tournament enters the knock-out phase, the food delivery service, which operates in 33 cities worldwide, took the time to comb through its data and make interesting — and surprising — observations about what European fans have ordered so far.

1) European cuisine is hardly first-league: despite strong and delicious culinary traditions in basically all Euro Cup countries, American cuisine emerged as the most-ordered cuisine during the Euro Cup — so far (with 18%). It was trailed by Asian (13%) and then Italian cuisine, which was the only European cuisine to crack the final three with just 8% of all orders.

2) The burger wins: burgers are the food to eat while watching the Euro Cup, at least according to European foodies, who ordered more burgers than any other meal.

3) Stack ‘em high: in fact, 27,485 burgers have been ordered so far, up by 5% from before the Euro Cup. That’s equivalent to the seating capacity of the stadium in Metz, France.

4) Cheering is hard work: 40% of orders were placed during a match, and 35% not long after a match concluded, suggesting that fans likely needed some fuel to cheer hard.

5) Chowing down is a team sport: 50% of orders were for two to four people while only 24% were for one to two people and 26% for more than four.

6) Sometimes hunger wins: 1,696 people were ordering from a computer when the first goal of the Euro Cup was scored — unfortunately for them. Hopefully they saw it anyways!

7) FOMO* is also real: many people were still very concerned about missing a goal. Maybe that’s why orders from app, as opposed to computer, increased by 5% during Euro Cup games.

8) Fans reach top speed to focus on the field: fans spent on average 2% less time browsing cuisine when ordering during a Euro Cup match, likely choosing to make a quick decision and then focus on the game.

9) Ice cream orders in Italy went up by 72% during the first two weeks of the Euro Cup. Given Italy’s strong showing against Belgium and Sweden, that’s could be because victory tastes sweet.

10) Food goals: the top scorer for this phase of the Euro Cup was a French foodie who ordered 30 times. That’s a lot of #foodgoals scored!

11) A sushi upset: in Austria, sushi beat out burgers to become the most-ordered cuisine, showing that the burger’s position as the most-ordered Euro Cup food might be vulnerable.

12) Turning up in force: 800 foodora riders bravely teamed up to serve French foodies during the France - Romania kick-off match, up from the roughly 500 that foodora normally fields in France on a Friday night.

13) Strategic thinking: Germans were the most strategic food-orderers, carefully planning their meals by ordering before games began, so all they had to do was cheer and eat. (20,5% of their orders were placed before games.)

14) Euro spirit transcends borders: Norwegians and Finns placed 40% more orders for four or more people when Sweden was playing, suggesting that they gathered with their friends to cheer for — or against — their fellow nordics.

If you haven’t created your very own Euro Cup food ordering habit yet, there’s still time to indulge in some great food before the tournament ends. So why not gather your friends and support your team (if they’re still in) or just enjoy the Euro Cup in the tastiest way possible?

*FOMO: Fear of missing out

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About foodora

About foodora

foodora was launched in Germany in October 2014, backed by Rocket Internet in April 2015 and merged with Delivery Hero in September 2015. The on-demand delivery service currently connects high-quality restaurants and foodies in 10 countries and is changing the way food delivery is viewed and experienced globally.

How it works

Through the foodora website or via the new iOS and Android apps, customers can enter their postal code and view a curated list of restaurants serving their neighborhood. Once they have found their meal of choice, they can place the order in the comfort of their home or office, paying online through foodora’s secure platform. The order is then carefully prepared by the restaurant, picked up by the foodora logistics team and delivered to their doorstep in around 30 minutes.

Website: www.foodora.com